scottecs:

Ok, il prezzo è giusto, dal mio blog di Shockdom http://ift.tt/1C6ubZu

scottecs:

Ok, il prezzo è giusto, dal mio blog di Shockdom http://ift.tt/1C6ubZu

Shared Aug 28 with 78 notes » via - source + reblog
# scottecs# comic




Shared Aug 28 with 210,237 notes » via - source + reblog
# wreck-it ralph# disney




eenjolras:

when you accidentally start watching a crime show and can’t get yourself to switch the channel because now you wanna know who fucking did it


Shared Aug 28 with 285,823 notes » via - source + reblog
# yep# every damn time




Kiss me!
Ryugazaki Rei(CV. Hirakawa Daisuke), Hazuki Nagisa(CV. Yonaga Tsubasa), Matsuoka Rin(CV. Miyano Mamoru) - Free! Eps 7
(75,468)

samasamadesu:

Nagisa kun, can you translate "kiss me" into Japanese?
isn't it just "boku ni kisu shite"?
that's  what i thought.
I overheard Makoto senpai saying "kiss me" just now.
huh?! who did mako chan say "kiss me" to?
both of you, your pronunciation is horrible! it's "kiss me."
Rin-san!
Next episode, "The Locomotive of a Twist!"
Kiss me. (x10)
Perfect Body.
Perfect Body.
Shared Aug 28 with 13,616 notes » via - source + reblog
# Free!# miyano mamoru




mashable:

Here’s Every Costume Spider-Man Has Ever Worn

In honor of The Amazing Spider-Man 2 opening this weekend, here are 24 of Spider-Man’s classic looks.

Shared Aug 27 with 31,486 notes » via - source + reblog
# spiderman




Daisy
STEREO DIVE FOUNDATION - Daisy
(6,191)

musicinanime:

Daisy - Stereo Dive Foundation

Anime: Kyoukai no Kanata

Shared Aug 26 with 420 notes » via - source + reblog
# music# kyoukai no kanata




bryarly:

It makes me so mad that men “aren’t supposed” to wear eyeliner. 

Like, have you seen men in eyeliner?


Shared Aug 26 with 18,564 notes » via - source + reblog
# YES# PLEASE




thrillingtragedy:

tensualsexion:

raysoflightinthedark:

mapsontheweb:

Dialects of the Italian language

We may cry foul about the rules of English, but thank God the only thing we have to worry about is diction and accents, and not dialects.

And please consider that each of these dialectal region corresponds to different traditions, different mentality, different culture. Not to mention that, syntactically, Italian is one of the most difficult Neo-Latin languages because of the immense number of irregular verbs.
Gosh I love my country.

And dialects have different phonetic systems, different vocabulary, slang words derived from foreign languages and so on. Sometimes I find it difficult to recognize a dialect even though I can perfectly understand the dialect of its neighbouring cities. Even Rome itself has variations based on the suburb. Calabria, for example, has some dialects that are very similar to Sicilian, like Rosarnese (28), even though it’s not as close to Sicily as other parts of the region. And some colloquial terms (of dialects in Southern Italy) are derived from not only Greek, but also Arab. Among others. A lot of dialects are pretty much considered as languages of their own, not unlike Sardinian (which is officially a language of its own). It’s really complicated because, if the school system doesn’t do its job, this huge variety creates a reverse illiteracy towards Standard Italian.
Another thing I think could be noted is that there’s also a lot of mingling between dialects because of migrations from Southern Italy to the North. I met a relative from Calabria, recently, who went to live in Verona and she not only speaks and understands both dialects, but also uses words from Veronese when speaking in Calabrese. So it’s not only a sign of an incredibly rich cultural diversity (some meals have different names based on the region/city, for example), but also a chance for seeking mutual understanding. Or, if you’re a xenophobic asshole, a chance for discrimination.
The fact that there are a lot of dialects helps a lot with integration for sons of migrants, from what I’ve seen. They’re easier to pick up (dialects, I mean) because they’re more used with friends, in informal settings, and they help create bonds. Sadly enough, a person of foreign descent is less likely to be discriminated if they have an accent or speak a dialect. And before tumblr jumps at me for cultural erasure, don’t worry, everyone still keeps their own cultural elements. 
So, yeah, next time you wonder what’s the level of language proficiency in Italy, look at this map. An Italian will (have to) learn Standard Italian, its area’s dialect(s), English, a second foreign language starting from middle school (French or Spanish, but some schools also started offering Chinese as an option, in the last few years) and, if they choose to, Latin and Ancient Greek in high school. Some also develop great accents, some don’t. But now you know what they have to deal with ;)

thrillingtragedy:

tensualsexion:

raysoflightinthedark:

mapsontheweb:

Dialects of the Italian language

We may cry foul about the rules of English, but thank God the only thing we have to worry about is diction and accents, and not dialects.

And please consider that each of these dialectal region corresponds to different traditions, different mentality, different culture. Not to mention that, syntactically, Italian is one of the most difficult Neo-Latin languages because of the immense number of irregular verbs.

Gosh I love my country.

And dialects have different phonetic systems, different vocabulary, slang words derived from foreign languages and so on. Sometimes I find it difficult to recognize a dialect even though I can perfectly understand the dialect of its neighbouring cities. Even Rome itself has variations based on the suburb. Calabria, for example, has some dialects that are very similar to Sicilian, like Rosarnese (28), even though it’s not as close to Sicily as other parts of the region. And some colloquial terms (of dialects in Southern Italy) are derived from not only Greek, but also Arab. Among others. A lot of dialects are pretty much considered as languages of their own, not unlike Sardinian (which is officially a language of its own). It’s really complicated because, if the school system doesn’t do its job, this huge variety creates a reverse illiteracy towards Standard Italian.

Another thing I think could be noted is that there’s also a lot of mingling between dialects because of migrations from Southern Italy to the North. I met a relative from Calabria, recently, who went to live in Verona and she not only speaks and understands both dialects, but also uses words from Veronese when speaking in Calabrese. So it’s not only a sign of an incredibly rich cultural diversity (some meals have different names based on the region/city, for example), but also a chance for seeking mutual understanding. Or, if you’re a xenophobic asshole, a chance for discrimination.

The fact that there are a lot of dialects helps a lot with integration for sons of migrants, from what I’ve seen. They’re easier to pick up (dialects, I mean) because they’re more used with friends, in informal settings, and they help create bonds. Sadly enough, a person of foreign descent is less likely to be discriminated if they have an accent or speak a dialect. And before tumblr jumps at me for cultural erasure, don’t worry, everyone still keeps their own cultural elements. 

So, yeah, next time you wonder what’s the level of language proficiency in Italy, look at this map. An Italian will (have to) learn Standard Italian, its area’s dialect(s), English, a second foreign language starting from middle school (French or Spanish, but some schools also started offering Chinese as an option, in the last few years) and, if they choose to, Latin and Ancient Greek in high school. Some also develop great accents, some don’t. But now you know what they have to deal with ;)

Shared Aug 26 with 1,301 notes » via - source + reblog
# italian# languages




Kanjani8 feat. text posts 2/?

Shared Aug 23 with 110 notes » via - source + reblog
# kanjani8# text post meme




It’s Monday again. Do you need a pick-me-up? Have some hilarious quotes from The Lego Movie. You’re welcome and everything is awesome.

Shared Aug 22 with 20,836 notes » via - source + reblog
# the lego movie